The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang

Sometimes I avoid books just because there is too much hype about them. There’s nothing worse than getting excited about a book because everyone is loving it and then having it fall short of your expectations. I sincerely wish I hadn’t held off on reading this book – it was deeply realistic, heartwarmingly romantic, and relatable in ways I hadn’t expected.

Stella Lane thinks math is the only thing that unites the universe. She comes up with algorithms to predict customer purchases — a job that has given her more money than she knows what to do with, and way less experience in the dating department than the average thirty-year-old.

It doesn’t help that Stella has Asperger’s and French kissing reminds her of a shark getting its teeth cleaned by pilot fish. Her conclusion: she needs lots of practice — with a professional. Which is why she hires escort Michael Phan. The Vietnamese and Swedish stunner can’t afford to turn down Stella’s offer, and agrees to help her check off all the boxes on her lesson plan — from foreplay to more-than-missionary position…

Before long, Stella not only learns to appreciate his kisses, but to crave all the other things he’s making her feel. Soon, their no-nonsense partnership starts making a strange kind of sense. And the pattern that emerges will convince Stella that love is the best kind of logic…

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Recursion by Blake Crouch

I am a huge fan of the Book of the Month monthly subscription – every month I promise myself I’ll only get one book, but every month I end up maxing out my box. I love comparing with other people about what they chose for their monthly read – and Recursion seemed like the hot book of  June 2019. So without reading the summary or knowing much about it I picked it.

Memory makes reality.

That’s what New York City cop Barry Sutton is learning as he investigates the devastating phenomenon the media has dubbed False Memory Syndrome—a mysterious affliction that drives its victims mad with memories of a life they never lived.

That’s what neuroscientist Helena Smith believes. It’s why she’s dedicated her life to creating a technology that will let us preserve our most precious memories. If she succeeds, anyone will be able to re-experience a first kiss, the birth of a child, the final moment with a dying parent.

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How to Walk Away by Katherine Center

After recently reading Katherine’s new book, Things You Save in a Fire, I immediately looked up the rest of her bibliography and decided to start with How to Walk Away. I decided to go into the book blind – I didn’t even read the back cover summary before I dove in. That gamble paid off in spades – this book was just as emotionally packed as her latest book, but offered a totally different main character to root for.

Margaret Jacobsen has a bright future ahead of her: a fiancé she adores, her dream job, and the promise of a picture-perfect life just around the corner. Then, suddenly, on what should have been one of the happiest days of her life, everything she worked for is taken away in one tumultuous moment.

In the hospital and forced to face the possibility that nothing will ever be the same again, Margaret must figure out how to move forward on her own terms while facing long-held family secrets, devastating heartbreak, and the idea that love might find her in the last place she would ever expect.

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The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

This was my January 2019 Book of the Month selection – and the fact that I got around to reading it in July should give you an idea of what my TBR looks like. I kinda picked it on a whim because none of the other books really appealed to me – but shortly after picking it, the buzz for this book started growing and growing. I’m not much of a thriller reader, but with all the hype around it, I finally sat down and gave The Silent Patient a shot – and now I just might be a psychological thriller fan. This book was twisty, dark, and unexpected – everything I could have hoped for and more.

Alicia Berenson’s life is seemingly perfect. A famous painter married to an in-demand fashion photographer, she lives in a grand house with big windows overlooking a park in one of London’s most desirable areas. One evening her husband Gabriel returns home late from a fashion shoot, and Alicia shoots him five times in the face, and then never speaks another word.

Alicia’s refusal to talk, or give any kind of explanation, turns a domestic tragedy into something far grander, a mystery that captures the public imagination and casts Alicia into notoriety. The price of her art skyrockets, and she, the silent patient, is hidden away from the tabloids and spotlight at the Grove, a secure forensic unit in North London.

Theo Faber is a criminal psychotherapist who has waited a long time for the opportunity to work with Alicia. His determination to get her to talk and unravel the mystery of why she shot her husband takes him down a twisting path into his own motivations—a search for the truth that threatens to consume him….

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